Very Secure

Installing Software on the New Machine

After various delays, I have finally put together a machine running CentOS-6.9-x86_64-minimal.iso. My next task is to install necessary software. First I must clarify what I want to do with the computer.

The reasons I built the computer are:

1. To have a machine I can trusti that allows me to be maximally productive.

2. To gain a better understanding of the hardware and software I use.

3. To rid myself of my dependency on a company that treats its customers like cattle.

Keeping these reasons in mind, I need to go forward with the goal of installing software I've read and understood. Unfortunately, fully understanding each piece of code I use is an unrealistic ideal. Computing has perhaps left the world of math and entered the world of biology. The complexity is too great, so certain items will be installed on faith.

To give direction on what I need to install, I put together a list of what I would like to do with my machine.

1. Blog

2. Program

3. Communicate through IRC

4. Play Eulora

5. (Optional) Run a bitcoin node

In order to obtain what I need to do the above, I must setup software that helps me install other software. This begins by installing a V, or even better by writing my own V. Then I need to configure a network connection.

In order to blog I must install emacs, a graphics stack, and a web browser. I will install all three with yum. These pieces of software are examples of tools I depend on that I don't have time to fully read and understand. Also, by installing via yum, I am placing confidence in signatures from keys unknown to any of my trusted peers.

In order to write programs, I will need to setup my emacs environment. At a minimum I will need to make sure I have syntax highlighting. Some other features I find useful are jump-to-function-definition and auto-complete. However I am not so sure that these tools help me. Lastly, to continue my work on TheFleet, I will need to install sbcl, quicklisp, slime, and postgres.

For communicating through IRC, I will use V to press jfw's yrc client.

I noticed that there is no guide on Eulora's website for installing the game on CentOS. So I will try to compile the client from source and of course ask for help in #o or #e.

And lastly, for installing a bitcoin node I will use V to press trb.

There are other tasks I must do to setup my computer. For example, I need to setup an SSH key and add the public key to my VMs and blogs, etc. But the above list should keep me busy for now.

  1. to a certain degree []

3 Responses to “Installing Software on the New Machine”

  1. Diana Coman says:

    Do keep notes of the install on CentOS and then update the wiki on Eulorum too with a specific guide for CentOS, please.

  2. Jacob Welsh says:

    The network connection comes first, unless you mean to ferry RPMs and vpatches by some other means.

    Not sure if you know what a syslog daemon is; if not you'll certainly want to learn, install if necessary, configure & peruse the logs.

    You'll need to decide whether to apply initial or future rounds of yum updates. (At least since this is a stable distro they're much less likely to break things than, say, Gentoo.)

    I suggest trying to do without quicklisp: fetch your dependencies by hand, starting your own collection, and learn to use "asdf" directly. Same advice would apply to PyPI and any similar.

  3. whaack says:

    @Diana Coman

    Certainly, I'll do that with pleasure.

    @Jacob Welsh

    >The network connection comes first, unless you mean to ferry RPMs and vpatches by some other means.

    Yes of course. The only piece of software I might ferry over manually is V itself.

    > Not sure if you know what a syslog daemon is; if not you'll certainly want to learn, install if necessary, configure & peruse the logs.

    I don't know what it is, so I will investigate.

    > You'll need to decide whether to apply initial or future rounds of yum updates. (At least since this is a stable distro they're much less likely to break things than, say, Gentoo.)

    Hm not quite sure what you mean. I'll ask in chan tomorrow.

    >I suggest trying to do without quicklisp: fetch your dependencies by hand, starting your own collection, and learn to use "asdf" directly. Same advice would apply to PyPI and any similar.

    Alright, I see reasoning behind this. It's worth while to experience pain every time one adds a dependency.

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